English 402.02  Fall 2003
4-5:15 MW
Professor Janice Neuleib
438-7858 jneuleib@ilstu.edu http://www.ilstu.edu/~jneuleib/
Stv. 406, MWR 11-12

Packet at PIP # 53

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

This course explores composition theory and research, posing these and other questions: What research on composing has most influenced the Composition field?  How have these influential texts shaped ongoing professional discussions regarding the social construction of knowledge, cognitive models in the composing process, composition and difference, the influence of classical rhetoric, critical pedagogy, gender and writing, the intersections of composition and literary theories, and the politics of academic literacy? What role does/should composition research play in first-year writing courses and in writing/learning theories in general? What issues are most critical in the field? What research/theories are shaping the future of Composition Studies?
 

Class will include a variety of activities; everyone will have a chance to engage the issues in composition theory and research through individual, small group, and discussion.  You will keep a reading/writing log that records many kinds of readings, certainly beginning with the texts in the packet but extending to other works you read, see, hear, etc. This log discusses the issues for yourself, with others in class, and with me.  I'll expect direct questions, comments, and responses to readings and class activities (which should be in the log).

A midterm exam will reflect the master's and doctoral comps in that you will choose a reading list centered around a particular set of your interests.  You will write a synthesis; then I will write a question from you synthesis for you individually.

Your final project will consist of a long "paper" (though it could be a hypertext, a mixture of hypertext and other visual activities, something else I haven't thought of) which will include an active learning demonstration of your project at the end of the semester.  (NB: Please single space all work, six inch margins, no folders.)
 

Issues as we will cover in 402:

Research in composition--what it is and isn't  (Aug. 18, 20, 25, 27)

Composing/rhetorical theory--what's a theory  (Sept. 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, log due on 10)

History--how'd we get here  (Sept. 22, 24, 29, Oct. 1)

Culture and comp--where do we fit into world and US culture  (Oct. 6, 8, 13, 15, log due on 15 with midterm synthesis included; question will be returned to you on the 20st; midterm due on Oct 22.)

Language and comp  (Oct. 20, 22, 27, 39)

WAC--how do comp researchers talk to everyone else  (Nov. 3, 5) (Log due on 5 with project proposal included)

Composition, Technology, and Access  (Nov. 10, 12, 17)

Final project demonstrations  (Dec. 1, 3; Projects due Dec. 8)
 
 

AVAILABLE ONLINE (not in packet) :
 

Burgstahler, Sheryl. "Distance Learning, Universal Design, Universal Access." Educational Technology Review: International Forum on Educational Technology Issues & Applications. 10.1 ((2002): 1-12.

http:www.aace.org/pubs/etr/burgstaher.cfm or http://www.rit.edu/~easi/itd/itdv08n1/burgstahler.htm
 

Dunn, Patricia A.  Selection from Talking, Sketching, Moving: Multiple Literacies in the Teaching of Writing. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook Heinemann, 2001. (65-82). (Chap 3 - "Strategies for Using Sketching, Speaking, Movement, and Metaphor to Generate and Organize Text" ) http://www.heinemann.com/product/0570.asp (Once there, click on "Learn How Multiple Literacies. . ." )
 

North, Stephen M. "Research in Writing, Departments of English, and the Problem of Method."  ADE Bulletin 88 (Winter 1987): 13-20. Also online. http://www.ade.org/ade/bulletin/n088/088013.htm
 

Williams, Joseph. "The Phenomenology of Error."  CCC 32.2  (March 1981): 152--68. http://www.ncte.org/threshold/ccc/1981/3c3202ph.html
 

Lowe, Charles. "Speech Recognition: Sci-Fi or Composition?" Currents in Electronic Literacy 4 (Spring 2001).  http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/currents/spr01/lowe.html.
 
 


 
 
 
 
 
 

English 402.02  Fall 2002
4-5:15 MW
Professor Janice Neuleib
438-7858 jneuleib@ilstu.edu http://www.ilstu.edu/~jneuleib/
Stv. 406, MWR 11-12

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

This course explores Composition theory and research, posing these and other questions: What research on composing has most influenced the Composition field?  How have these influential texts shaped ongoing professional discussions regarding the social construction of knowledge, cognitive models in the composing process, composition and difference, the influence of classical rhetoric, critical pedagogy, gender and writing, the intersections of composition and literary theories, and the politics of academic literacy? What role does/should composition research play in first-year writing courses and in writing/learning theories in general? What issues are most critical in the field? What research/theories are shaping the future of Composition Studies?
 

Class will include a variety of activities; everyone will have a chance to engage the issues in composition theory and research through individual, small group, and discussion.  You will keep a reading/writing log that records many kinds of readings, certainly beginning with the texts in the packet but extending to other works you read, see, hear, etc. This log discusses the issues for yourself, with others in class, and with me.  I'll expect direct questions, comments, and responses to readings and class activities (which should be in the log).

A midterm exam will reflect the master's and doctoral comps in that you will choose a reading list centered around a particular set of your interests.  You will write a synthesis; then I will write a question from you synthesis for you individually.

Your final project will consist of a long "paper" (though it could be a hypertext, a mixture of hypertext and other visual activities, something else I haven't thought of) which will include an active learning demonstration of your project at the end of the semester.  (NB: Please single space all work, six inch margins, no folders; email is good.)
 

Issues as we will cover in 402:

Research in composition--what it is and isn't  (Aug. 19, 21, 26, 28)

Composing/rhetorical theory--what's a theory  (Sept. 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, log due on 11)

History--how'd we get here  (Sept. 23, 25, 30, Oct. 2)

Culture and comp--where do we fit into world and US culture  (Oct. 7, 9, 14, 16, log due on 16 with midterm synthesis included; question will be returned to you on the 21st; midterm due on Oct 23.)

Language and comp  (Oct. 21, 23, 28, 30)

WAC--how do comp researchers talk to everyone else  (Nov. 4, 6) (Log due on 6 with project proposal included)

Composition, Technology, and Access  (Nov. 11, 12)

Final project demonstrations  (Nov. 24, 26, Dec. 2, 4; Projects due Dec. 11)
 
 

AVAILABLE ONLINE (not in packet) :
 

Burgstahler, Sheryl. "Distance Learning, Universal Design, Universal Access." Educational Technology Review: International Forum on Educational Technology Issues & Applications. 10.1 ((2002): 1-12.

http:www.aace.org/pubs/etr/burgstaher.cfm or http://www.rit.edu/~easi/itd/itdv08n1/burgstahler.htm

Dunn, Patricia A. and Kathleen Dunn DeMers. "Reversing Notions of Disability and Accommodation: Embracing Universal Design in Writing Pedagogy and Web Space." Kairos 7/1 (Spring 2002)

http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/7.1/coverweb/dunn_demers/index.html

Dunn, Patricia A.  Selection from Talking, Sketching, Moving: Multiple Literacies in the Teaching of Writing. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook Heinemann, 2001. (65-82). (Chap 3 - "Strategies for Using Sketching, Speaking, Movement, and Metaphor to Generate and Organize Text" ) http://www.heinemann.com/product/0570.asp (Once there, click on "Learn How Multiple Literacies. . ." )

North, Stephen M. "Research in Writing, Departments of English, and the Problem of Method."  ADE Bulletin 88 (Winter 1987): 13-20. Also online. http://www.ade.org/ade/bulletin/n088/088013.htm

Williams, Joseph. "The Phenomenology of Error."  CCC 32.2  (March 1981): 152--68. http://www.ncte.org/threshold/ccc/1981/3c3202ph.html

Lowe, Charles. "Speech Recognition: Sci-Fi or Composition?" Currents in Electronic Literacy 4 (Spring 2001).  http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/currents/spr01/lowe.html.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


English 402   Introduction to Composition Studies
Fall 1999
MW 4-5:15

Dr. Janice Neuleib
406 Stevenson Hall
(309) 438-7858        jneuleib@ilstu.edu
Office Hours:  11 M-R and by appointment

Course Description:

Content:  Composition theory and research have grown in ever widening circles of interest intersecting with other fields and conceptual arenas.  This course will provide a theoretical and historical overview of this complex field and will investigate key issues at stake in the study and teaching of composing.  The course will connect composition studies with postmodern literary theory, with changes in social science research methods and practices, and with the political and psychosocial debates implicit and explicit in the researching and teaching of writing.

Format:  Understanding and introjecting research and theory require intense involvement with the issues at hand.  You will write regularly in class and work through problems and activities aimed at honing your critical responses to the works investigated and at inviting you into the community of composition researchers as a participant in the discussion.

Texts:

Dunn, Patricia. Learning Re-Abled: The Learning Disability Controversy and Composition Studies.  Portsmouth: Heinemann, 1995.
Crowley, Sharon. Composition in the University:  Historical and Polemical Essays.  Pittsburgh: U of Pittsburgh P, 1998.
Faigley, Lester.  Fragments of Rationality:  Postmodernity and the Subject of Composition.  Pittsburgh:  U of Pittsburgh P, 1992.
North, Stephen.  The Making of Knowledge in Composition: Portrait of an Emerging Field.  Portsmouth: Heinemann, 1987.
Villanueva, Victor.  Cross-Talk in Comp Theory: A Reader. Urbana: NCTE, 1997.

Recommended Resources:

Brody, Miriam.  Manly Rhetoric:  Gender, Rhetoric, and the Rise of Composition.  Carbondale:  Southern Illinois UP, 1993.
Bullock, Richard, and John Trimbur, eds.  The Politics of Writing Instruction:  Postsecondary.
Crowley, Sharon.  The Methodical Memory:  Invention in the Current Traditional Rhetoric.  Carbondale, I L: Southern Illinois UP, 1990.
Fiore, Kyle, and Nan Elasser, "'Strangers No More': A Liberatory Literacy
Curriculum" CE 44 (1982):  115-28.
George Hillocks, Jr. "The Need for Interdisciplinary Studies on the
  Teaching of Writing," Rhetoric Review 7 (1989): 257-72.
Hillocks, George, Jr.  Research on Written Composition:  New Directions for Teaching.  Urbana:  NCTE, 1986.
hooks, bell.  talking back:  thinking feminist, thinking black.  Boston:  South End P.  1989.
Lauer, Janice, and William Asher.  Composition Research:  Empirical Designs.  New York:  Oxford UP, 1988.
Lindemann, Erika and Gary Tate.  Introduction to Composition Studies.  New York:  Oxford, 1991.
Knoblauch, C.H. "Rhetorical Constructions:  Dialogue and Commitment" CE 50
(1988):  125-40.
Kirsch, Gesa.  Women Writing the Academy:  Audience, Authority, and Transformation.  Carbondale:  Southern Illinois UP, 1993.
Murphy, James J.  A Short History of Writing Instruction.  Davis:  Hermagoras, 1990.
James E. Porter, "Intertextuality and the Discourse Community," Rhetoric
Review 5 (1986):  34-47.
Robertson, Linda, Sharon Crowley, and Frank Lentricchia, "The Wyoming
Conference Resolution Opposing Unfair Salaries and Working Conditions for
Post-Secondary Teachers of Writing." CE 49 (1987): 274-80.
Rose, Mike.  Lives on the Boundary.  New York: Penguin, 1989.
Williams, Joseph. "The Phenomenology of Error," CCC 32 (1981):  152-68.

Most Readings are on reserve in the library.   Project readings will be found in appropriate journals either in the library or in 409G.
 

Course Assignments:

Planning, Writing, and Presenting Your Papers and Exam
You will write two papers in this class, keep a reading log, and take a midterm exam.  On paper one you will collaborate with one or two other members of the class to produce a study of a problem currently under discussion in the field of composition studies.  The midterm exam will be a model of a comprehensive essay question.  The second paper will be a longer study of an issue or research subject that you find engaging.  Each paper will be around fifteen pages though the length should fit the subject.  In addition, you will write questions after each class and answer these questions in your reading log.  The log can also contain questions for me and for other members of the class as well as observations on the class and on your reading.  The log need not be limited to class assignment, in fact, should not be so limited.
 

Subjects for discussion and reflection.

History  (including topics and issues)
Theory  &  Research  (types of inquiry)
Practice  (lore and reflection)
Debates  (dissenting voices)
 

Week 1  (I’ll be out of town. Claire Lamonica will meet with you.)
Aug. 25 & 27--Introduction:  Where are you as a writing specialist?  What do you expect?  Where are you in the history?
Read  Section 1 of Villanueva.
Week 2
Sept. 1 & 3--The Changing Landscape of Theory--Read pp. 1-79 in Faigley and Section 2 in Villanueva and introductory chapters in North and Crowley.
Week 3
Sept. 8--Backdrops/Frameworks: Read the rest of North--where research has been and may go
Assignment Due:   Select collaborative groups and tentative topics.
Week 4
Sept. 13 & 15--Discovery in Rhetoric/Composition:  Read Section 3 in Villanueva.
 Assignment Due: Reading log due.

Week 5
Sept. 20 & 22--Theories in Context:  Complete Faigley.
 Assignment Due:  Present group drafts to class

Week 6
Sept. 27 & 29—Social Theory and Composing:  Read Section 4 in Villanueva.
 Assignment Due:  Collaborative paper due.

Week 7
Oct. 4 & 6—MIDTERM  ON 4; DISCUSSION AND REVISION ON 6.

Week 8
Oct. 11 & 13—Other voices begun:  Read Dunn.
 Assignment Due:  Reading log due.

Oct. 18 & 20—Questioning the future:  Complete Crowley
 Assignment Due: Present topic for second paper.
Week 10
Oct. 25 & 27—Other directions: Read Section 6 in Villanueva
.Week 11
Nov. 1 & 3—Synthesizing the issues.
 Assignment Due:  Read drafts of second paper.
Week 12
Nov. 8 & 10-Future research and teaching questions
 Assignment Due: Last reading log due.
Week 13
Nov. 15 & 17—Presentations of papers begin
Week 14
Nov.  22 & 24—Presentations continue.
Week 15
Nov. 29 & Dec. 1—Complete presentations
Week 16
Dec. 6 & 8—Final activities.  Paper two due Dec. 8.