Course Number:  English 409.02
Course Title: Issues of Grammar
Professor:            Janice Neuleib
Credit Hours: 3
Meeting Time: 9-1 on every other Saturday
Meeting Place:  STV 410
Reference No:  302861
 

COURSE PACKET: A packet of readings is available at Pip’s on campus.

Baron, Dennis. Grammar and Good Taste. New Haven: Yale UP, 1982.
Braddock, Richard, Richard Lloyd-Jones, and Lowell Schoer. Research in Written Composition. Urbana: NCTE, 1963.
Brosnahan, Irene, and Janice Neuleib. “Teaching Grammar Affectively: Learning to Life Grammar.” The Place of Grammar in Writing Instruction. Eds. Susan Hunter and Ray Wallace. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1995.
Hartwell, Patrick. “Grammar, Grammars, and the Teaching of Grammar.” College English 47 (February 1985): 105-27.
Neuleib, Janice. “The Relation of Formal Grammar to Composition.” College Composition and Communication. 28 (October 1977):247-250.
Neuleib, Janice, and Irene Brosnahan. “Teaching Grammar to Writers.” Teaching Developmental Writing. Ed. Susan Naomi Bernstein. Boston: Bedford, 2001. 91-97.
Neuleib, Janice. Writing Skills. Grand Rapids: Instructional Fair, 1996.
Scharton, Maurice, and Janice Neuleib.  “Comfortable Clothes: Using Type to Design Assignments.” Most Excellent Differences. Ed. Tom Thompson. Gainsville, FL: CAPT, 1996.
Scharton, Maurice, and Janice Neuleib. Inside/Out: A Guide to Writing. Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 1993.
Zebroski, James. Thinking Through Theory. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1994.

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE
 

A Scottish word for grammar is glamour, used because learning was associated with magic (New American Heritage Dictionary). In this course, we will investigate the ways in which schools have used grammar instruction as a kind of magic bullet to solve the complex problems of student learning, student composing, student critical thinking, and student satisfaction with nearly everything. Grammar does have magical powers for our profession, for the subject can raise passions, spark discussions, and sometimes even please and amuse those of us who love systems and complex problems. We will read recent research and theory on school grammar and spend time looking at school practices. We will look especially at what different schools do with grammar instruction and at the reasons for their choices. This course will provide an opportunity to observe what is done, theorize about those practices, and then draw conclusions from these investigations.
 

FORMAT OF COURSE:

The class will include a variety of kinds of group work including group investigations of grammar instruction in classes (or lack thereof), research designs for these investigations, and group responses to the studies produced by the class members. We will read around various texts and will discover together the strands and directions for our projects. Everyone will contribute through both reading and writing about the topic but also through responses to others’ writings about their work. The class will work through logs, short papers, and research reports. A research portfolio will develop during the semester which will culminate in a paper/project that will have a clear possible place of publication. The theme of the course will be teacher research into this wonderful and mysterious subject of grammar. We will all work together to solve the mystery of why grammar continues to be such a challenge in the schools.

We will meet every other Saturday with some Saturdays off because I will be out of town. Here’s a tentative schedule.
 
 

17 January 04    Get to know one another and discuss research possibilities

31 January 04   Bring two articles or books for a read around with the group. Be prepared to talk briefly about why you have chosen the works you have brought.

14 February 04  Bring to more articles of essays for the read around. Again, be prepared to talk about the works you have brought.  Logs due with tentative topics for research

28 February 04  Research planning. We will work together to set either individual or group research plans.

13 March 04  First research reports to be presented to the group.  Logs due with abstract of research—short paper format.

10 April 04  Working day on research projects. I will have been away for three Saturdays, so by this time you will have your projects well underway.

24 April 04  Presentations of research projects

1 May 04  Continued presentations and final details.

Ryan's working bib:

Baron, Dennis. Grammar and Good Taste. New Haven: Yale UP, 1982.
Braddock, Richard, Richard Lloyd-Jones, and Lowell Schoer. Research in Written Composition. Urbana: NCTE, 1963.
Breeze, Jean “Binta”.  “English: a co-opted language.”  Critical Quarterly 35 (Winter 1993):  13-14.
Brosnahan, Irene, and Janice Neuleib. “Teaching Grammar Affectively: Learning to Life Grammar.” The Place of Grammar in Writing Instruction. Eds. Susan Hunter and Ray Wallace. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1995.
Cameron, Deborah.  “Mixing it:  The poetry and politics of bad English.”  Critical Quarterly 40 (Winter 1998):  107-110.
“English Grammar:  The Most Vital Subject In Your Curriculum.”  Home School Curriculum Plus.  24 February 2004  <http://www.home-school-curriculum-plus.com>.
Giegerich, Steve.  “Students Gear Up for Timed Essay on SAT.”  Yahoo! News.  23 February 2004.  Associated Press.  23 February 2004  <http://story.news.yahoo.com>.
Hartwell, Patrick. “Grammar, Grammars, and the Teaching of Grammar.” College English 47 (February 1985): 105-27.
Hoppen, K. Theodore.  “Grammars of Electoral Violence in Nineteenth-Century England and Ireland.”  English Historical Review 13 (June 1994):  597-620.
Neuleib, Janice. “The Relation of Formal Grammar to Composition.” College Composition and Communication. 28 (October 1977):247-250.
Neuleib, Janice, and Irene Brosnahan. “Teaching Grammar to Writers.” Teaching Developmental Writing. Ed. Susan Naomi Bernstein. Boston: Bedford, 2001. 91-97.
Neuleib, Janice. Writing Skills. Grand Rapids: Instructional Fair, 1996.
Nunberg, Geoffrey.  “The Bloody Crossroads of Grammar and Politics.”  nytimes.com.  1 June 2003.  The New York Times Company.  28 January 2004  <http://www-csli.stanford.edu/~nunberg/possessives.html>.
“Rush-Online.com:  EBONICS.”  Rush-Online.com.  24 February 2004  <http://www.rushonline.com/visitors/ebonics.html>.
Safire, William.  “Could the Body Take Down the Hammer?”  LexisNexis.  17 Jan 1999. The New York Times Company.  28 January 2004  <http://web.lexis-nexis.com>.
Scharton, Maurice, and Janice Neuleib.  “Comfortable Clothes: Using Type to Design Assignments.” Most Excellent Differences. Ed. Tom Thompson. Gainsville, FL: CAPT, 1996.
Scharton, Maurice, and Janice Neuleib. Inside/Out: A Guide to Writing. Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 1993.
United States 106th Congress.  Bill Emerson English Language Empowerment Act of 1999 (Introduced in House).  Washington:  GPO, 1999.
United States 106th Congress.  Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States establishing English as an official language of the United States (Introduced in House).  Washington:  GPO, 1999.
Willis, Scott.  “Responding to Public Opinion.”  Education Update 37 (June 1995).  23 February 2004  <http://www.acsd.org/publications/ed_update/199506/willis.html>.
Zebroski, James. Thinking Through Theory. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1994.
Zuber, Sharon, and Ann M. Reed.  “The Politics of Grammar Handbooks:  Generic He and Singular They.”  College English 55 (September 1993):  515-523.